Verse of the Day

Friday, June 6, 2014

Pastor's Sermon Notes: The First Recorded Pauline Sermon (Acts 13:13-41)

The First Recorded Pauline Sermon
Acts 13:13-41

13 Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem. 14 But when they departed from Perga, they came to Antioch in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down. 15 And after the reading of the law and the prophets the rulers of the synagogue sent unto them, saying, Ye men and brethren, if ye have any word of exhortation for the people, say on. 16 Then Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said, Men of Israel, and ye that fear God, give audience. 17 The God of this people of Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they dwelt as strangers in the land of Egypt, and with an high arm brought he them out of it. 18 And about the time of forty years suffered he their manners in the wilderness. 19 And when he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Chanaan, he divided their land to them by lot. 20 And after that he gave unto them judges about the space of four hundred and fifty years, until Samuel the prophet. 21 And afterward they desired a king: and God gave unto them Saul the son of Cis, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, by the space of forty years. 22 And when he had removed him, he raised up unto them David to be their king; to whom also he gave testimony, and said, I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will. 23 Of this man’s seed hath God according to his promise raised unto Israel a Saviour, Jesus: 24 When John had first preached before his coming the baptism of repentance to all the people of Israel. 25 And as John fulfilled his course, he said, Whom think ye that I am? I am not he. But, behold, there cometh one after me, whose shoes of his feet I am not worthy to loose. 26 Men and brethren, children of the stock of Abraham, and whosoever among you feareth God, to you is the word of this salvation sent. 27 For they that dwell at Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they knew him not, nor yet the voices of the prophets which are read every sabbath day, they have fulfilled them in condemning him. 28 And though they found no cause of death in him, yet desired they Pilate that he should be slain. 29 And when they had fulfilled all that was written of him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a sepulchre. 30 But God raised him from the dead: 31 And he was seen many days of them which came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses unto the people. 32 And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, 33 God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. 34 And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give you the sure mercies of David. 35 Wherefore he saith also in another psalm, Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. 36 For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption: 37 But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption. 38 Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins: 39 And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses. 40 Beware therefore, lest that come upon you, which is spoken of in the prophets; 41 Behold, ye despisers, and wonder, and perish: for I work a work in your days, a work which ye shall in no wise believe, though a man declare it unto you.


Introduction:

The 5th of 10 Significant Speeches/Sermons is found in recorded in this chapter
(3 by Peter, 1 by Stephen, 6 by Paul - 3 during missionary journeys, and 3 during arrest and trial = almost ¼ of the content of Acts): 
Acts 13:16-41 - Paul to the Jews at Pisidian Antioch

The 5th of 9 Major Problems or Issues identified will occur in this chapter: 
The dispute and breach between Paul and Barnabas over John Mark (13:13; 15:36-40)

Outline:

I.  The Setting for the First Recorded Pauline Sermon (13:13-15)

II.  The Content of the First Recorded Pauline Sermon (13:16-41)

I.  The Setting for the First Recorded Pauline Sermon (13:13-15)

13 Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem. 14 But when they departed from Perga, they came to Antioch in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down. 15 And after the reading of the law and the prophets the rulers of the synagogue sent unto them, saying, Ye men and brethren, if ye have any word of exhortation for the people, say on.

1.  The Changes from Cyprus (13:13)
2.  The Entrance to the Synagogue (13:14)
3.  The Invitation to Speak (13:15)

1.  The Changes from Cyprus (13:13)

1)  A Change of Location

Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos,
they came to Perga in Pamphylia

            Perga in Pamphylia - A city in the region on the coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey).

Acts 14:24-26 - And after they had passed throughout Pisidia, they came to Pamphylia. And when they had preached the word in Perga, they went down into Attalia: And thence sailed to Antioch, from whence they had been recommended to the grace of God for the work which they fulfilled.

2)  A Change of Personnel

and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem

            In this account of John Mark’s return home no reason is given to explain why he did so.
           
This is stated here matter-of-factly, but later will be the cause of a breach in the relationship between Paul and Barnabas, or at least the basis for a dispute between them that results in a divided effort.  This occurred following their return to Antioch from the meeting with the Jerusalem Church over the Gentile converts being required by some to be circumcised during the planning for a second missionary journey.

Acts 15:36-40 - And some days after Paul said unto Barnabas, Let us go again and visit our brethren in every city where we have preached the word of the Lord, and see how they do. And Barnabas determined to take with them John, whose surname was Mark. But Paul thought not good to take him with them, who departed from them from Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work. And the contention was so sharp between them, that they departed asunder one from the other: and so Barnabas took Mark, and sailed unto Cyprus;

2.  The Entrance to the Synagogue (13:14) [1]

But when they departed from Perga, they came to Antioch in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down.

Antioch in Pisidia - distinct from Syrian Antioch, the sending church north of Palestine.  This Antioch is in a province in what is now Turkey north of the coastal province of Pamphylia.

3.  The Invitation to Speak (13:15)

And after the reading of the law and the prophets the rulers of the synagogue sent unto them, saying, Ye men and brethren, if ye have any word of exhortation for the people, say on.

Notice the emphasis in the synagogue worship services on the reading of Scripture followed by exhortation.

It may be an understatement that the rulers of this synagogue had no idea concerning what they were about to hear!

II.  The Content of the First Recorded Pauline Sermon (13:16-41)

16 Then Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said, Men of Israel, and ye that fear God, give audience. 17 The God of this people of Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they dwelt as strangers in the land of Egypt, and with an high arm brought he them out of it. 18 And about the time of forty years suffered he their manners in the wilderness. 19 And when he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Chanaan, he divided their land to them by lot. 20 And after that he gave unto them judges about the space of four hundred and fifty years, until Samuel the prophet. 21 And afterward they desired a king: and God gave unto them Saul the son of Cis, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, by the space of forty years. 22 And when he had removed him, he raised up unto them David to be their king; to whom also he gave testimony, and said, I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will. 23 Of this man’s seed hath God according to his promise raised unto Israel a Saviour, Jesus: 24 When John had first preached before his coming the baptism of repentance to all the people of Israel. 25 And as John fulfilled his course, he said, Whom think ye that I am? I am not he. But, behold, there cometh one after me, whose shoes of his feet I am not worthy to loose. 26 Men and brethren, children of the stock of Abraham, and whosoever among you feareth God, to you is the word of this salvation sent. 27 For they that dwell at Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they knew him not, nor yet the voices of the prophets which are read every sabbath day, they have fulfilled them in condemning him. 28 And though they found no cause of death in him, yet desired they Pilate that he should be slain. 29 And when they had fulfilled all that was written of him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a sepulchre. 30 But God raised him from the dead: 31 And he was seen many days of them which came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses unto the people. 32 And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, 33 God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. 34 And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give you the sure mercies of David. 35 Wherefore he saith also in another psalm, Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. 36 For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption: 37 But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption. 38 Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins: 39 And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses. 40 Beware therefore, lest that come upon you, which is spoken of in the prophets; 41 Behold, ye despisers, and wonder, and perish: for I work a work in your days, a work which ye shall in no wise believe, though a man declare it unto you.

This should be understood, first of all, as an example of what had been done on Cyprus as intended by “they preached the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews” (at Salamis, 13:5).

Secondly, this first recorded example of the preaching of Paul should be compared to the earlier sermons recorded in Acts by Peter (Acts 2:14-40; 3:12-26; and 10:34-41), and especially that by Stephen (Acts Acts 7:2-53).

1.  The Introduction of the Message - A Recitation of Israel’s History (13:16-22)
2.  The Body of the Message - The Exposition of God’s Fulfillment (13:23-37)
3.  The Conclusion of the Message - The Application to Paul’s Hearers (13:38-42)

1.  The Introduction of the Message - A Recitation of Israel’s History (13:16-22)

16 Then Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said, Men of Israel, and ye that fear God, give audience. 17 The God of this people of Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they dwelt as strangers in the land of Egypt, and with an high arm brought he them out of it. 18 And about the time of forty years suffered he their manners in the wilderness. 19 And when he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Chanaan, he divided their land to them by lot. 20 And after that he gave unto them judges about the space of four hundred and fifty years, until Samuel the prophet. 21 And afterward they desired a king: and God gave unto them Saul the son of Cis, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, by the space of forty years. 22 And when he had removed him, he raised up unto them David to be their king; to whom also he gave testimony, and said, I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will.

Then Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said

It must be asserted at this point in the face of most of what passes as “scholarly” treatments of not only this sermon, but all of the sermons in The Acts of the Ascended Christ by His Holy Spirit through His Apostles, that there is a predominant failure to approach the Scriptures as the authoritative revelation from God.  If the literature on this subject is digested it soon becomes obvious that the inspired Word of God is once again being studied primarily - and it may fairly be extended to “entirely” - as the word of man, as a human document, with Luke very much in the foreground.  The inspiration of the words in this book by the Holy Spirit of God is either being denied outright, ignored altogether, or cavalierly dismissed in the mass of literature on this subject as is commonly to be detected elsewhere in publications on the Scriptures (what I would refer to as the “Satanic Sirens of Skeptical Scholarship”).  The assumptions that drive the mass of falsely so-called scholarship on the sermons place this document on a level playing field with similar works in the first century culture and the preceding eras.  The operating presuppositions in such publications are that the sermons are to be interpreted on the basis of comparison with similar non-canonical accounts, and subjected to the scrutiny of uninspired authorities.  Such approaches to the exegesis of the sermons in Acts do not begin and end with the authority of the inspired Word of God interpreted by the divine Author through comparison with other Scriptures.  Rather, the divine authorship becomes a non-issue, something not to be factored into a consideration of the content of the sermons.  The conclusions presented by such research are not surprising when the sources in the unproven assumptions and proud presuppositions that drive the “scholars” thinking are considered. [2]

Men of Israel, and ye that fear God, give audience. [3]

This is the first of three direct addresses of the listeners in the synagogue in this sermon (cp. 13:26, 38).

A distinction is made between Jews and God-fearers, or Gentile converts. [4]

“It is instructive to compare Paul’s sermon in Pisidian Antioch with the other speeches in Acts. It has much in common with Peter’s speeches—the emphasis on the Jerusalem Jews’ responsibility for Jesus’ death, the contrast between the death on the cross and the triumph of the resurrection, the apostolic witness, the proofs from Scripture (even some of the same texts), and the call to repentance. One would expect many of the same emphases. This, as with most of Peter’s sermons, was a speech to Jews. Paul’s sermons to Gentiles (chaps. 14; 17) would be radically different. This sermon has a feature in common also with Stephen’s speech—namely, the long introductory sketch of Jewish history. There is a radically different function for the historical sketches in the two speeches, however. Stephen used Old Testament history to depict the rebelliousness of the Jews toward their divinely appointed leaders. Paul used it to show God’s faithfulness to his promises for Israel, promises that were ultimately fulfilled in Christ.” [5]

“As Squires notes, in the historical survey, the syntax itself emphasizes God’s role with Israel, with nine of ten indicative verbs indicating God’s care for Israel.” [6]

“Throughout, God is seen to have kept his promises to those who fear him.  As Soards says, Paul  makes a “theologically saturated survery of history, which ended in a christological claim.” [7]

1)  The Election of the Patriarchs, the Sojourn in Egypt and the Miracle of the Exodus (13:17)
2)  The Generation in the Wilderness (13:18)
3)  The Conquest of the Land (13:19)
4)  The Time of the Judges (13:20)
5)  The Beginning of the Monarchy (13:21-22b)
6)  The Testimony Concerning David (13:22c-g)

1)  The Election of the Patriarchs, the Sojourn in Egypt and the Miracle of the Exodus (13:17)

The God of this people of Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they dwelt as strangers in the land of Egypt, and with an high arm brought he them out of it.

Genesis 12 - Numbers 9 - God…chose…and exalted…and brought…them out

2)  The Generation in the Wilderness (13:18)

And about the time of forty years suffered he their manners in the wilderness.

Numbers 10 - Deuteronomy - God put up with them

3)  The Conquest of the Land (13:19)

And when he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Chanaan, he divided their land to them by lot.

Joshua - God destroyed the Canannites and God gave the land of Canaan to the Israelites

4)  The Time of the Judges (13:20)

And after that he gave unto them judges about the space of four hundred and fifty years, until Samuel the prophet.

Judges - God gave Israel judges

5)  The Beginning of the Monarchy (13:21-22b)

And afterward they desired a king: and God gave unto them Saul the son of Cis, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, by the space of forty years. 22 And when he had removed him, he raised up unto them David to be their king;

1 Samuel - 2 Samuel - God gave Israel Saul as a king, God removed Saul, and God raised up David as Israel’s king

6)  The Testimony Concerning David (13:22c-g)

to whom also he gave testimony, and said, I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will.

1 Samuel - 2 Samuel - God testified concerning David

cp. 1 Sam. 16:13 and 2 Sam. 2:4 - David anointed by Samuel, and then by the men of Judah

Ps. 89:20-21 - I have found David my servant; with my holy oil have I anointed him:
With whom my hand shall be established: mine arm also shall strengthen him.

1 Sam. 13:14 - But now thy kingdom shall not continue: the LORD hath sought him a man after his own heart, and the LORD hath commanded him to be captain over his people, because thou hast not kept that which the LORD commanded thee.

This is the turning point in the sermon.  The arrival at this moment in Israel’s history with the focus on King David in this quotation signals a significant shift in the proclamation by Paul.

“in the interpretation of the significance of these events one sees that God is still the overarching, controlling figure whose own divine purposes were accomplished through Jesus.” [8]

2.  The Body of the Message - The Exposition of God’s Fulfillment (13:23-37)

23 Of this man’s seed hath God according to his promise raised unto Israel a Saviour, Jesus: 24 When John had first preached before his coming the baptism of repentance to all the people of Israel. 25 And as John fulfilled his course, he said, Whom think ye that I am? I am not he. But, behold, there cometh one after me, whose shoes of his feet I am not worthy to loose. 26 Men and brethren, children of the stock of Abraham, and whosoever among you feareth God, to you is the word of this salvation sent. 27 For they that dwell at Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they knew him not, nor yet the voices of the prophets which are read every sabbath day, they have fulfilled them in condemning him. 28 And though they found no cause of death in him, yet desired they Pilate that he should be slain. 29 And when they had fulfilled all that was written of him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a sepulchre. 30 But God raised him from the dead: 31 And he was seen many days of them which came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses unto the people. 32 And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, 33 God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. 34 And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give you the sure mercies of David. 35 Wherefore he saith also in another psalm, Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. 36 For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption: 37 But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption.

1) The Preaching of Repentance - Prophesied by John the Baptist (13:23-25)
2) The Word of Salvation - Rejected by the Jews (13:26-31)
3) The Gospel of Resurrection - Fulfilled in Jesus (13:32-37)

1) The Preaching of Repentance - Prophesied by John the Baptist (13:23-25)

23 Of this man’s seed hath God according to his promise raised unto Israel a Saviour, Jesus: 24 When John had first preached before his coming the baptism of repentance to all the people of Israel. 25 And as John fulfilled his course, he said, Whom think ye that I am? I am not he. But, behold, there cometh one after me, whose shoes of his feet I am not worthy to loose.

God raised up Jesus as a Savior to Israel

There is an emphasis on fulfillment in the repetition found in each of the points in the body of this sermon.

John the Baptist fulfilled his ministry.

2) The Word of Salvation - Rejected by the Jews (13:26-31)

 26 Men and brethren, children of the stock of Abraham, and whosoever among you feareth God, to you is the word of this salvation sent. 27 For they that dwell at Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they knew him not, nor yet the voices of the prophets which are read every sabbath day, they have fulfilled them in condemning him. 28 And though they found no cause of death in him, yet desired they Pilate that he should be slain. 29 And when they had fulfilled all that was written of him, they took him down from the tree, [9] and laid him in a sepulchre. 30 But God raised him from the dead: 31 And he was seen many days of them which came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses unto the people.

This is introduced by the second of the three direct forms of address in this sermon (cp. 13:16, 38). [10]

The three failures of Israel:
(1) they failed to recognize Jesus for Who He is (13:27c),
(2) they failed to understand the prophets (13:27d), and
(3) they failed to find fault with Jesus (13:28).

Again we hear of fulfillment:
Israel fulfilled all of the words of the prophets when they condemned Jesus (13:27e, 29a).

3) The Gospel of Resurrection - Fulfilled in Jesus (13:32-37) [11]

 32 And we [12] declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, 33 God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. 34 And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give you the sure mercies of David. 35 Wherefore he saith also in another psalm, Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. 36 For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption: 37 But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption.

Now the emphasis on fulfillment comes to a climax:
God fulfilled His promise to the Fathers to their children…God raised up Jesus from the dead

The difference between Jesus and David:  Jesus is not just another like David - there is a connection, but here is also a very great difference.  There is continuity, but there is also a mighty discontinuity between David and Jesus!

Psalm 2:7 - Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee.

Isaiah 55:3 - I will give you the sure mercies of David

Psalm 16:10 - Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption

“The quotations emphasize that the covenant of David is fulfilled in Jesus, already suggested in vv. 32-33.” [13]

3.  The Conclusion of the Message - The Application to Paul’s Hearers (13:38-42)

38 Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins: 39 And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses. 40 Beware therefore, lest that come upon you, which is spoken of in the prophets; 41 Behold, ye despisers, and wonder, and perish: for I work a work in your days, a work which ye shall in no wise believe, though a man declare it unto you.

1)  The Blessing of Forgiveness through Christ (13:38-39a)
2)  The Impossibility of Justification through Moses (13:39b)
3)  The Warning against Unbelief from the Prophets (13:40-41)

1)  The Blessing of Forgiveness through Christ (13:38-39a)

Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins: And by him all that believe are justified from all things,

This is the third and final direct address in the sermon marking the conclusion (cp. 13:16, 26).

Acts 5:29-32 - 29 Then Peter and the other apostles answered and said, We ought to obey God rather than men. 30 The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom ye slew and hanged on a tree.
31 Him hath God exalted with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness of sins. 32 And we are his witnesses of these things; and so is also the Holy Ghost, whom God hath given to them that obey him.

Acts 26:14-20 - 14 And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. 15 And I said, Who art thou, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. 16 But rise, and stand upon thy feet: for I have appeared unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of those things in the which I will appear unto thee; 17 Delivering thee from the people, and from the Gentiles, unto whom now I send thee, 18 To open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins, and inheritance among them which are sanctified by faith that is in me. 19 Whereupon, O king Agrippa, I was not disobedient unto the heavenly vision: 20 But shewed first unto them of Damascus, and at Jerusalem, and throughout all the coasts of Judaea, and then to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, and do works meet for repentance.

Through Him forgiveness is preached!

By Him believers are justified! This is the only occurrence of this verb in the book of Acts! [14]

2)  The Impossibility of Justification through Moses (13:39b)

 from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.

Not by the Law!

3)  The Warning against Unbelief from the Prophets (13:40-41)

 Beware therefore, lest that come upon you, which is spoken of in the prophets; 41 Behold, ye despisers, and wonder, and perish: for I work a work in your days, a work which ye shall in no wise believe, though a man declare it unto you.

Hab. 1:5 (LXX) - Behold ye among the heathen, and regard, and wonder marvellously: for I will work a work in your days, which ye will not believe, though it be told you.

Would you call this the preaching of the Gospel, or have you been so influenced by what passes as such in our day that you do not recognize the true preaching of the Gospel when you hear it and read it?  Would such confrontational words from the Scriptures as we find in this sermon, and equally provocative words in the earlier sermons of Peter and Stephen be foreign to the ears of evangelicals in modern America?  Would such preaching be thought rude or judgmental or unloving in our day?  Will we judge the preaching of the Gospel like we judge worship music - if it sounds good to us or makes us feel good it must be good?  Or will we submit to the Word of God, and measure our ministries by the standard of the Scriptures?

Conclusion:

I.  The Setting for the First Recorded Pauline Sermon (13:13-15)

1.  The Changes from Cyprus (13:13)

2.  The Entrance to the Synagogue (13:14)

3.  The Invitation to Speak (13:15)

II.  The Content of the First Recorded Pauline Sermon (13:16-41)

1.  The Introduction of the Message - A Recitation of Israel’s History (13:16-22)

1)  The Election of the Patriarchs, the Sojourn in Egypt and the Miracle of the Exodus (13:17)

2)  The Generation in the Wilderness (13:18)

3)  The Conquest of the Land (13:19)

4)  The Time of the Judges (13:20)

5)  The Beginning of the Monarchy (13:21-22b)

6)  The Testimony Concerning David (13:22c-g)

2.  The Body of the Message - The Exposition of God’s Fulfillment (13:23-37)

1) The Preaching of Repentance - Prophesied by John the Baptist (13:23-25)

2) The Word of Salvation - Rejected by the Jews (13:26-31)

3) The Gospel of Resurrection - Fulfilled in Jesus (13:32-37)

3.  The Conclusion of the Message - The Application to Paul’s Hearers (13:38-42)

1)  The Blessing of Forgiveness through Christ (13:38-39a)

2)  The Impossibility of Justification through Moses (13:39b)

3)  The Warning against Unbelief from the Prophets (13:40-41)

[Sermon preached 25 MAY 2014 by Pastor John T. “Jack” Jeffery at Wayside Gospel Chapel, Greentown, PA.]

Resources on Acts:

G. K. Beale and D. A. Carson, eds., Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2007), pp. 513-606.

Paul Barnett, The Birth of Christianity: The First Twenty Years, After Jesus, Vol. 1 (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2005).

Darrell L. Bock, Acts, Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, eds. Robert W. Yarbrough and Robert H. Stein (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2007).
                                                  
F. F. Bruce, The Acts of the Apostles: The Greek Text with Introduction and Commentary, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1951, 1952).

I. Howard Marshall, Acts: An Introduction And Commentary, Vol. 5 in Tyndale New Testament Commentaries, gen. ed. Leon Morris (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1980; 2008 reprint).

David G. Peterson, The Acts of the Apostles, The Pillar New Testament Commentaries, gen. ed. D. A. Carson (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2009).

John B. Polhill, Acts, Vol. 26 in The New American Commentary, gen. ed. David S. Dockery (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman, Publishers, 1992).

Eckhard J. Schnabel, Acts, Vol. 5 in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, gen. ed. Clinton E. Arnold (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2012).

William H. Willimon, Acts, in Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching, series ed. James Luther Mays, New Testament ed. Paul J. Achtemeier (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2010).

Resources on the Sermons in Acts:

F. F. Bruce, The Speeches in the Acts of the Apostles (London: The Tyndale Press, 1942). 
Note: This was delivered as The Tyndale New Testament Lecture 19 DEC 1942 at a Conference of graduate and theological student members of the Inter-Varsity Fellowship in Wadham College, Oxford.  Available as a free PDF on Biblical Studies at http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/speeches_bruce.pdf [accessed 8 FEB 2013].

F. F. Bruce, “The Speeches In Acts―Thirty Years After,” Robert Banks, ed., Reconciliation and
Hope. New Testament Essays on Atonement and Eschatology Presented to L.L. Morris on his 60th
Birthday (Carlisle: The Paternoster Press, 1974), pp. 53-68; PDF on
Biblical Studies at http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/rh/acts_bruce.pdf [accessed 8 FEB 2013].

William L. Lane, "The Speeches of the Book of Acts", in Jerusalem and Athens: Critical Discussions on the Philosophy and Apologetics of Cornelius Van Til, ed. E. R. Geehan (Phillipsburg, NJ:  Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Co., 1971), pp. 260-272, Ch. XIII, notes on pp. 473-477.

Resources on Paul:

Kenneth E. Bailey, Paul Through Mediterranean Eyes: Cultural Studies in 1 Corinthians  (Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2011).

F. F. Bruce, Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1977).

D. A. Carson, The Gagging of God: Christianity Confronts Pluralism (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996), pp. 496-501.

W. J. Conybeare and J. S. Howson, The Life, Times and Travels of St. Paul, 2 vols. in 1, unabridged American ed. (New York: E. B. Treat U Co., 1869); on Google Books at http://books.google.com/books?id=Bn1CAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 12 FEB 2013].

Adolf Deissmann, Paul: A Study in Social and Religious History, 2nd ed., trans. William E. Wilson (New York: Harper Torchbooks, n.d.).

F. W. Farrar, The Life and Work of St. Paul (New York: E. P. Dutton and Co., 1889); on Google Books at http://books.google.com/books?id=RB2KeCSM6KsC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 12 FEB 2013].

Bruce N. Fisk, “Paul: Life and Letters”, in The Face of New Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research, ed. Scot McKnight and Grant R. Osborne (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2004), pp. 283-325.

Richard B.Gaffin, Jr., "Acts and Paul", 46 lectures (MP3 format), WTS Resources Media Center on Westminster Theological Seminary at http://wts.edu/resources/media.html?paramType=audio&filterTopic=5&filterSpeaker=10&filterYear=2005 [accessed 20 MAR 2013].

Frank J. Goodwin, A Harmony of the Life of the St. Paul According to the Acts of the Apostles and the Pauline Epistles (New York: American Tract Society, 1895); on Google Books at http://books.google.com/books?id=YgpEAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 12 FEB 2013].

Richard N. Longenecker, The Ministry And Message Of Paul (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1971).

Richard N. Longenecker, Paul, Apostle Of Liberty (New York: Harper & Row, 1964).

Richard N. Longenecker, ed., The Road From Damascus : The Impact Of Paul's Conversion On His Life, Thought, And Ministry (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).

Richard N. Longenecker, Studies In Paul, Exegetical And Theological (Sheffield : Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2004).

J. Gresham Machen, The Origin of Paul's Religion: The James Sprunt Lectures Delivered at Union Theological Seminary in Virginia (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1925).

Leon Morris, The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1955).

John Pollock, The Apostle: A Life of Paul, 3rd ed. (Colorado Springs: David C. Cook, 1969, 2012); also published as The Man Who Shook the World (Wheaton: Victor Books, 1972; originally The Apostle: A Life of Paul, New York: Doubleday, 1969).

Stanley E. Porter, Paul in Acts, in Library of Pauline Studies, gen. ed. Stanley E. Porter (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, Inc., 1999; 2001 reprint of The Paul of Acts: Essays in Literary Criticism, Rhetoric and Theology, in Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 115, by Mohr Siebeck, Tubingen).

W. M. Ramsay, The Cities of St. Paul: Their Influence on his Life and Thought (New York: A. C. Armstrong and Son; London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1908); on Google Books at http://books.google.com/books?id=JryEbmKool0C&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 13 FEB 2013].

W. M. Ramsay, Pauline and Other Studies in Early Christian History (New York: A. C. Armstrong and Son, 1906); on Google Books at http://books.google.com/books?id=-1ZJAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 13 FEB 2013].

W. M. Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveler and the Roman Citizen, 10th ed. (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1907); on Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL) at http://www.ccel.org/ccel/ramsay/paul_roman.html [accessed 13 FEB 2013].

W. M. Ramsay, The Teaching of Paul in terms of The Present Day: The Deems Lectures in New York University (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1914); on Internet Archive at http://ia600404.us.archive.org/2/items/teachingofpaulin00rams/teachingofpaulin00rams.pdf [accessed 13 FEB 2013].

A. T. Robertson, Epochs in the Life of Paul: A Study of Development in Paul's Character (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1974).

Eckhard J. Schnabel, Paul The Missionary: Realities, Strategies And Methods (Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2008).

Udo Schnelle, Apostle Paul: His Life and Theology, trans. M. Eugene Boring (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2003; trans. from Paulus: Leben und Denken, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co., n.d.).

Thomas R. Schreiner, Paul, Apostle of God's Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology (Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2001).

James Stalker, The Life of St. Paul, (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1885; rev. ed. 2010 by Kessinger Publishing from 1912 ed.); on Google Books at http://books.google.com/books?id=vT0HAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 7 FEB 2013].

James Ironside Still, St. Paul on Trial (London: Student Christian Movement, 1923).




[1] For other occasions and locations when Paul is recorded as visiting synagogues see Adolf Deissmann, Paul: A Study in Social and Religious History, 2nd ed., trans. William E. Wilson (New York: Harper Torchbooks, n.d.), pg. 238, note 2.
[2] F. F. Bruce, The Speeches in the Acts of the Apostles (London: The Tyndale Press, 1942), delivered as The Tyndale New Testament Lecture 19 DEC 1942 at a Conference of graduate and theological student members of the Inter-Varsity Fellowship in Wadham College, Oxford, and available as a free PDF on Biblical Studies at http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/speeches_bruce.pdf [accessed 8 FEB 2013]; F. F. Bruce, “The Speeches In Acts―Thirty Years After,” Robert Banks, ed., Reconciliation and Hope. New Testament Essays on Atonement and Eschatology Presented to L.L. Morris on his 60th Birthday (Carlisle: The Paternoster Press, 1974), pp. 53-68; PDF on Biblical Studies at http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/rh/acts_bruce.pdf [accessed 8 FEB 2013]; and Udo Schnelle, Apostle Paul: His Life and Theology, trans. M. Eugene Boring (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2003; trans. from Paulus: Leben und Denken, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co., n.d.), pp. 119-120.  Contrast the treatment presented by William L. Lane, "The Speeches of the Book of Acts", in Jerusalem and Athens: Critical Discussions on the Philosophy and Apologetics of Cornelius Van Til, ed. E. R. Geehan (Phillipsburg, NJ:  Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Co., 1971), pp. 260-264.  Lane offers his essay “…to Prof. Van Til as an example of the auxiliary task assumed by the Biblical scholar who is committed to the presupposition that the Scriptures are the inspired and authoritative Word of God.” Lane, op. cit., note 1, pg. 473.
[3] “In Paul’s firt major speech, he is seen to be creating a bridge in his person, and in his audience, between the Jewish origins and original Jewish audience of the Gospel and the subsequent presentation of the gospel to Gentiles by the Apostle to the Gentiles.” Porter, ibid.
[4] Schnelle, op. cit., pg. 130; and Stanley E. Porter, Paul in Acts, in Library of Pauline Studies, gen. ed. Stanley E. Porter (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, Inc., 1999; 2001 reprint of The Paul of Acts: Essays in Literary Criticism, Rhetoric and Theology, in Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 115, by Mohr Siebeck, Tubingen), pg. 133. “We have only one account in Acts in which Paul proclaims the gospel to Jews and Gentiles familiar with the Old Testament (cf. Acts 13:16-41).” Thomas R. Schreiner, Paul, Apostle of God's Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology (Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2001), pg. 77.
[5] Polhill, J. B. (1995). Vol. 26: Acts. The New American Commentary (299). Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers.  For example, Carson wrote, regarding Paul’s sermon on Mars Hill in Athens, “Paul’s approach, preaching to these people who had never heard the Old Testament and had never heard of Moses, was radically different from his approach in, say, the synagogue of Pisidian Antioch (Acts 13:13ff.), where the burden of his preaching is that Jesus really did fulfill the Old Testament prophecies, rightly understood, and that failure to bow to him would bring down Old Testament promises of judgment.  Clearly, such an approach would mean nothing to those who had never heard of the Hebrew Bible, much less read it.” D. A. Carson, The Gagging of God: Christianity Confronts Pluralism (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996), pg. 497.  Porter also notes that, “Next to Paul’s speech in Athens, this is probably the most widely discussed Pauline speech in Acts, the two major topics of discussion being the use of the Old Testament quotations and its relationship to other speeches, in particular Peter’s and Stephen’s.”  Porter, op. cit., pg. 131. Interestingly, one of the six sources cited by Porter in a footnote at this point “…compares the speech with Jesus’ initial speech in Luke 4:16-30.” Porter, ibid., note 17, citing G. L├╝demann, Early Christianity according to the Traditions in Acts: A Commentary, trans. J. Bowden (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1987), pg. 153. “…within the structure of Luke’s two-volume work, it corresponds to Jesus’ inaugural sermon in Nazareth (Luke 4:16-30).” Schnelle, op. cit., pg. 119.
[6] Porter, op. cit., pg. 134; citing John T. Squires, The Plan of God in Luke-Acts, Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 76 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), pg. 70.
[7] Porter, ibid.; citing Marion L. Soards, The Speeches in Acts: Their Content, Context, and Concerns (Louisville: Westminster/John Knox, 1994), pg. 83.
[8] Soards, op. cit., pg. 84; cited by Porter, op. cit., pg. 135.
[9] “Paul’s reference to the Deuteronomic tree” (Gal. 3:13; Acts 13:29) is likewise Petrine in origin (Acts 5:30; 10:39; 1 Pet. 2:24).” Paul Barnett, The Birth of Christianity: The First Twenty Years, After Jesus, Vol. 1 (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2005), pg. 77.
[10] Concerning the use of the first part of this form of address in Acts 2, McClain remarks, “In verse 29 it is “Men and brethren,” a cusomary form of address to Israelites (cf. 13:26; 23:1).” Alva J. McClain, The Greatness of the Kingdom: An Inductive Study of the Kingdom of God (Winona Lake, IN: BMH Books, 1959), pg. 398.
[11] On this point see F. F. Bruce, The Defense of the Gospel in the New Testament, rev. ed. (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1959, 1977), pp. 16-18.  See also Barmett’s comparison of these verses to Rom. 1:1-4 in Paul Barnett, op. cit., pp. 92-93.
[12] “…the explicitly grammaticalized subject…”  Porter, ibid.
[13] Porter, op. cit., pg. 136.
[14] On this subject see Leon Morris, The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1955), pp. 244-274, and especially pp. 259-260.

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