Verse of the Day

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Announcement: No service at Wayside Gospel Chapel on Sunday 16 JUL 2017

Announcement

There will not be a worship service at Wayside Gospel Chapel in Greentown, PA on Sunday 16 JUL 2017. We are gathering with Faith Baptist Fellowship Church in Lake Ariel, PA for our annual "Missionary Sunday" with our dear friends Noah and Adelaide Quarshie from Ghana. Signs have been posted on the front door of the building, and on the church sign on the corner of the property to make this known to any visitors. 

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436
Web site: http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Sixteen

Reminder Notice: Session Sixteen of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ is scheduled for WED 9 AUG 2017.

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview


Session Sixteen: Doctor Evangelicus: The Morningstar of the Reformation” 

Date and Time: Wednesday 9 AUG 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436
Web site: http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Note: This is a correction to the date posted on 11 JUL 2017 due to a scheduling conflict.

Monday, June 12, 2017

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Fifteen

Notice: Session Fifteen of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ is scheduled for WED 14 JUN 2017.

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview

Session Fifteen: “The Bonfire of the Vanities” 

Date and Time: Wednesday 14 JUN 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436
Web site: http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Friday, June 2, 2017

Change to Weekend Bible Conference schedule on Saturday 3 JUN 2017

Notice

The  Weekend Bible Conference schedule for Saturday 3 JUN 2017 has been changed as follows:

1. The start time is 7 PM, not 6 PM as previously posted.

2. There will not be a fellowship dinner between the two sessions. Instead there will be a coffee and dessert time. 

The Weekend Bible Conference announcement post has been updated with these changes. See Wayside Gospel Chapel at http://waysidegospelchapel.blogspot.com/2017/05/2017-weekend-bible-conference-with.html.

I hope that this does not create any confusion. Please let others know who you think may be interested in attending as soon as possible.

Pastor Jack

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

2017 Weekend Bible Conference with David Morris at Faith Baptist Fellowship Church [updated 2 JUN 2017]

Faith Baptist Fellowship Church (Lake Ariel, PA) and Wayside Gospel Chapel (Greentown, PA) are hosting the 15th Annual Weekend Bible Conference Saturday, June 3rd, and Sunday, June 4th, 2017.

All conference sessions this year will be at Faith Baptist Fellowship Church, 1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436. Faith Baptist Fellowship Church's website is at http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/. The church building may be located on Google Maps at Faith Baptist Fellowship Church.

The first two sessions of the conference are scheduled for Saturday evening beginning at 7:00 p.m. with a coffee and dessert time between the sessions. 
Note: This is a recent change to both the start time, and the information previously posted about a fellowship dinner.

The closing session of the Conference will be the Sunday morning worship service beginning at 10:00 a.m. Our conference preacher, David Morris, will also be teaching Sunday School which begins at 9:00 a.m. 

David B. Morris will once again be expounding the Scriptures at our annual Weekend Bible Conference. David is no stranger to us as this is his 14th visit as our featured Bible Conference preacher.



David studied Classics and Linguistics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, following his conversion in 1973. After nearly twenty years of pastoral ministry, he entered an itinerant ministry of evangelism and conference speaking. David and his Terri have six children, and will be celebrating their 36th wedding anniversary this year.

David has ministered in the past at:
1) the John Bunyan Conference (New Ringgold, and Lewisburg, PA);
2) the International Baptist Conference (Toronto, Canada);
3) the Sovereign Grace Bible Conference founded by Elder D. J. Ward, Main Street Baptist Church (Lexington, KY); and at, 
4) the Center for Pioneer Church Planting of To Every Tribe Ministries (Los Fresnos, TX).

Many of his sermons (currently 41) are available on SermonAudio.com at David Morris [accessed 9 MAY 2017].

Don't miss this opportunity to gather together with Faith Baptist Fellowship Church and Wayside Gospel Chapel as we are ministered to by this gifted preacher and teacher of God's Word! Please contact Pastor Jeffery if you need further information at waysidegospelchapel (at) yahoo (dot) com.

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Fourteen

Notice: Session Fourteen of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ is scheduled for WED 10 MAY 2017.

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview

Session Fourteen: “The Dark Middle Ages” 

Date and Time: Wednesday 10 MAY 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436
Web site: http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Thirteen

Notice: Session Thirteen of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ is scheduled for WED 22 MAR 2017.

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview

Session Thirteen: “Augustine: the Doctor of Grace, From Confessions to The City of God,” 
Part 5, The City of God: An Introduction and Appreciation (Continued)

Date and Time: Wednesday 22 MAR 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436
Web site: http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Twelve

Notice: Session Twelve of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ is scheduled for this evening, WED 8 MAR 2017.

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview

Session Twelve: “Augustine: the Doctor of Grace, From Confessions to The City of God,” 
Part 4, The City of God: An Introduction and Appreciation

Date and Time: Wednesday 8 MAR 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436
Web site: http://faithbaptistfellowshipch.com/

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Pastor's Sermon Notes: Philippians (series), Part 10: The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (Philippians 2:5-11), Part Four

Sermon Series: Philippians, Part 10
The Great Christological Confession:
The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi, Part Four
Philippians 2:5-11


[Audio file on Internet Archive at https://archive.org/details/Philippians25-11_766].

5  Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: 6 Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 7 But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 8 And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. 9 Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: 10 That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; 11 And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Introduction:

Verse 9 signals a significant shift in the context. There is an abrupt reversal of the conclusion of verse 8, and a dramatic movement from the depths of Christ’s Humiliation to the opposite extreme in His Exaltation.

Transition:

There is difficulty for us in the way the sentence comprising verses 9-11 is phrased in maintaining the connection to verse 5 and the reason why these verses are here in the first place. As we consider verse 9, and two significant aspects of what this verse teaches us, we must enter into it with an understanding of its purpose in the context, and come away from it with an appreciation for its application to us in our relationships to God, and to one another.

Outline:

Part 2: The Exaltation of Christ in The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:9-11)

I. The Unparalleled Exaltation of His Christ (2:9)

1. The Preeminent Exaltation of His Servant —
            Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him

2. The Superlative Designation of His Name —
            and given him a name which is above every name

II. The Universal Prostration of His Creation (2:10)

III. The Unanimous Confession of His Coronation (2:11)

Previous Outlines:

The Preface to the The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:5)

1. The Supreme Incarnational Mindset: This mind

2. The Sanctified Indwelling Mentality: in you…in Christ Jesus

3. The Shared Basis in Union with Christ: also

Part 1: The Humiliation of Christ The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:6-8)

I. The Mind-Boggling Mentality of the Messiah (2:6)

1. Eternal Deity — Who, being in the form of God

2. Essential Equality — thought it not robbery to be equal with God

II. The Essence of the Action of Incarnation (2:7)

1. The Hidden God — But made himself of no reputation

2. The Suffering Servant — and took upon him the form of a servant

3. The Son of Man — and was made in the likeness of men

III. The Highlighting of the Humiliation of Christ Jesus (2:8)

1. The Prerequisite for the Humiliation of Jesus Christ — And being found in fashion as a man

2. The Assertion of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ he humbled himself

3. The Nature of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ and became obedient unto death

4. The Extent of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ even the death of the cross.

Part 2: The Exaltation of Christ in The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:9-11)

I. The Unparalleled Exaltation of His Christ (2:9)

Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name:

Here, in the words of this verse, we learn of the grand conclusion, the rewarding result of the mind of Christ in action — veiling His deity, becoming a humble human servant, obeying to the degrading death of crucifixion. Here in the Word of God we are brought to the exaltation and designation of Jesus Christ the Lord — The response of God the Father to the obedience of God the Son as the Son of Man.

1. The Preeminent Exaltation of His Servant —
          Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him

What did God the Father do? What does this include? What does it involve?

In the Septuagint (LXX, Greek Old Testament) the identical compound Greek verb used by Paul in Phil. 2:9 is found.

Ps. 97:9 — For thou, LORD, art high above all the earth: thou art exalted far above all gods.

This is not just exaltation. This is a unique word only used here in the New Testament that speaks of an “above and beyond” exaltation. Donald Macleod[1] and G. Walter Hansen[2] refer to this as “hyper-exaltation.” William Hendriksen suggested another way of expressing this: “super-exalted.”[3]

This exaltation was prophesied:

Is. 52:13 — Behold, my servant shall deal prudently, he shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high.

Is. 53:10d-12 — 10….he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. 11 He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities. 12 Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.

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Excursus on Isaiah 53:12

The significance of this prophesied exaltation may be missed in Is. 53:12 due to the way it is usually translated (KJV: Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong[4]; cp. also NASB, ESV, NIV, etc.), but at least two modern translations have expressed the words of this verse in a way that may be more helpful in expressing exactly what was prophesied here:

HCSB: Therefore I will give Him the many as a portion, and He will receive the mighty as spoil…[5]

NLT: I will give him the honors of a victorious soldier…[6]

In other words, in this exaltation He is not viewed as one among many others who are also considered “great” or “strong.” He is not to be viewed in this as one among many dividing the spoils of war between themselves as sharing in a relative greatness or strength. Rather, those previously considered as such are given to Him as His portion, as the spoils of His war. Those who were exalted in the past are now, by comparison, and by the act of God the Father in the fulfillment of this prophesy, no longer to be viewed as such. They are His portion. Their greatness and strength are spoiled. He owns them. (Rev. 21:24 — And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it: and the kings of the earth do bring their glory and honour into it.)

Jamieson, Fausset and Brown would have us understand Hengstenberg as holding this view:  

with … greatHengstenberg translates, “I will give Him the mighty for a portion”; so the Septuagint.”[7]

However, a careful reading of all that Hengstenberg writes on this portion of the verse tells a different tale. He prefaces the translation mentioned above with “The first words are thus explained by many interpreters.” Then Hengstenberg includes their explanation (not his), which he follows with his objections to it — “Therefore I will give Him mighty ones for His portion, and strong ones He shall divide as a spoil.” He does acknowledge early in his objections in a parenthetical remark: “although, indeed, this explanation is given by the LXX….Vulg….”
— Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg, Christology of the Old Testament and a Commentary on the Messianic Predictions, Vol. 2, 2nd ed., trans. Theodore Meyer, in Clark’s Foreign Theological Library, New Series, Vol. IX (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1856), pp. 307-308; on Internet Archive at https://archive.org/details/christologyoldt03henggoog [accessed 16 FEB 2017].

John Gill acknowledges this understanding of the verse, but seems more favorable to it than Hengstenberg.

“Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great,.... The great ones of the earth, the kings and princes of the earth: these are the words of God the Father, promising Christ that he shall have as great a part or portion assigned him as any of the mighty monarchs of the world, nay, one much more large and ample; that he would make him higher than the kings of the earth, and give him a name above every name in this world, or that to come; and all this in consequence of his sufferings, and as a reward of them; see Philippians 2:8 and whereas the Lord's people are his portion, and with which Christ is well pleased, and greatly delighted, Deuteronomy 32:9, they may be intended here, at least as a part of the portion which Christ has assigned him. For the words may be rendered, "therefore will I divide, assign, or give many to him": so the Vulgate Latin version; and which is favoured by the Targum,

“therefore will I divide to him the prey of many people;'”

and by the Septuagint version, therefore he shall inherit many, or possess many as his inheritance; so the Arabic version. The elect of God were given to Christ, previous to his sufferings and death, in the everlasting council of peace and covenant of grace, to be redeemed and saved by him; and they are given to him, in consequence of them, to believe in him, to be subject to him, and serve him; and so it denotes a great multitude of persons, both among Jews and Gentiles, that should be converted to Christ, embrace him, profess his Gospel, and submit to his ordinances; and which has been true in fact, and took place quickly after his resurrection and ascension.

And he shall divide the spoil with the strong; or "the strong as a spoil"; that is, he shall spoil principalities and powers, destroy Satan and his angels, and make an entire conquest of all his mighty and powerful enemies. The Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and Arabic versions, render the words, "he shall divide the spoil of the strong"; of Satan and his principalities; those they make a spoil of he shall take out of their hands, and possess them as his own. The best comment on this version is Luke 11:22. Or rather the words may be rendered, "he shall have or possess for a spoil or prey very many"; for the word for "strong" has the signification of a multitude; and so the sense is the same as before, that a great multitude of souls should be taken by Christ, as a prey out of the hands of the mighty, and become his subjects; and so his kingdom would be very large, and he have great honour and glory, which is the thing promised as a reward of his sufferings. Some understand, by the "great" and "strong", the apostles of Christ, to whom he divided the gifts he received when he led captivity captive; to some apostles, some prophets &c. Ephesians 4:10, and others the soldiers, among whom his garments were parted; but they are senses foreign from the text.”[8]

See also Lumina:[9]

“As J. Olley wrote: “Yahweh has won the victory and vindicates his Servant, giving to him many subservient people, together with their spoils. These numerous peoples in turn receive blessing, sharing in the “peace” resulting from Yahweh’s victory and the Servant’s suffering” (John W. Olley, “‘The Many’: How Is Isa 53,12a to Be Understood,” Bib 68 [1987]: 330-56).”

Robert B. Chisholm, Jr. follows Olley[10] in this approach to translating Is. 53:12.

“Therefore I will allot to him the many,
and with a multitude he will divide the spoil,”

— Robert B. Chisholm, Jr., “Forgiveness and Salvation in Isaiah 53,” in The Gospel According to Isaiah 53: Encountering the Suffering Servant in Jewish and Christian Theology, eds. Darrell L. Bock, and Mitch Glaser (Grand Rapids: Kregel Academic, 2012), pg. 197. See especially Chisholm’s extensive footnote on this understanding (op. cit., pg. 197, note 32); on Google Books at https://books.google.com/books?id=PTM3-W9yNBUC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false [accessed 16 FEB 2017].

******************************************************************************

Christ Himself prophesied one aspect of His exaltation:

Jn. 10:17 — Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again.

This exaltation was revealed as fulfilled:

Mt. 28:18 — And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. (Remember Is. 53:12!?!?)

Acts 2:33 — Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.

Acts 5:31 — Him hath God exalted with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness of sins.

Heb. 1:9 — Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.

Heb. 2:9 — But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.

Stephen saw the exalted Christ in the moments just prior to his death by stoning (Acts 7), as did the Apostle Paul in his confrontation on the road to Damascus, and the Apostle John in the visions of the Revelation.

This exaltation was revealed as fulfilled in the most complete manner by the Apostle Paul in another epistle:

Eph. 1:17-23 17 That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him: 18 The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints, 19 And what is the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power, 20 Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead, and set him at his own right hand in the heavenly places, 21 Far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come: 22 And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church, 23 Which is his body, the fulness of him that filleth all in all.

This exaltation, properly understood, includes Christ’s resurrection and His ascension. It also involves Christ’s eternal stature. In all of the various aspects of His exaltation by the Father it must be understood that His Person is viewed in this exaltation in His human nature. This term may not be understood with reference to His divine nature, except as it is coupled in His Person with His human nature. As God, the Son of God, He cannot be anymore exalted than He ever was. As the Son of Man what He receives from God the Father is something that has never been seen before. He brings to glory a new reality enthroned forever at the Father’s right hand.

Col. 1:18-20 — 18 And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. 19 For it pleased the Father that in him should all fulness dwell; 20 And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven.

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2. The Superlative Designation of His Name —
          and given him a name which is above every name

The focus in this clause should be on the verb, but the significance is often missed.

“to give or grant graciously and generously, with the implication of good will on the part of the giver—‘to give, to grant, to bestow generously.’”[11]

The first part of this is undoubtedly true. The second is certainly not.
“The Pauline element lies in the context rather than the usage….The institution of Jesus into the dignity of the κύριος is a reward given for His obedience.[12]

On the sense of the verb “given,” see especially Geerhardus Vos, The Pauline Eschatology (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1979 reprint of 1930 original by Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ), pg. 275, note 13:

“The Greek original for “gave,” “ἐχαρίσατο,” should not be overlooked in this passage. The name which Jesus had rightfully earned yet was bestowed upon Him by manner of grace. Even when God enters into the recompense-relationship with man He does so in virtue of an unmerited act of favor, granting something that He was in no wise bound to give.”

This verb is also used in a previous context in Phil. 1:29 (27-30) — For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake;

What name?

Why do modern translations read “the name” while older translations have “a name”?

Acts 5:41— And they departed from the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer shame for his name.

Heb. 1:4 — Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.

Is the Name given by the Father to the Son:[13]

1) Jesus?

2) Jesus Christ?

3) Lord?

4) Jesus Christ the Lord, or the Lord Jesus Christ?

And to complicate matters even more by moving out of the immediate context, and out of the writings of the Apostle Paul, to that of another Apostle: Rev. 19:11-16 — 11 And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war. 12 His eyes were as a flame of fire, and on his head were many crowns; and he had a name written, that no man knew, but he himself. 13 And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood: and his name is called The Word of God. 14 And the armies which were in heaven followed him upon white horses, clothed in fine linen, white and clean. 15 And out of his mouth goeth a sharp sword, that with it he should smite the nations: and he shall rule them with a rod of iron: and he treadeth the winepress of the fierceness and wrath of Almighty God. 16 And he hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written, KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS.

Issues:

1) Name versus title, or name and title synonymous, overlapping and interchangeable

2) The immediately following identification “the name of Jesus” (2:10)

3) The name “Jesus” previously given at the announcement of His conception — to Joseph in Mt. 1:21 (by “the angel of the Lord;” context 1:18-25), and to Mary in Lk. 1:31 (by “the angel Gabriel;” context 1:26-35)

4) The name “Jesus” previously given at the announcement of His conception was explicitly ties to His exaltation in Lk. 1:32-33

5) The flow of the passage culminating in His universal acknowledgment as “Lord” (2:11)

6) His preexistent identity as Lord

Scholars cannot help themselves, and must make an issue out of the identification of the “name.” There is a day coming, and soon, when there will be no debate about this. It will no longer be discussed as an item of academic curiosity, and all confusion concerning the intent of these words will cease. The Name that the Father gave to the Son in His exaltation, the preeminent Name will be known, and understood, and will necessarily be the signal of universal submission and worship.

The stern Gospel reminder:

Mt. 11:23 — And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.

Mt. 23:12 — And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted.

Lk. 1:52 — He hath put down the mighty from their seats, and exalted them of low degree.

Lk. 10:15 — And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted to heaven, shalt be thrust down to hell.

Lk. 14:11 — For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.

Lk. 18:14 — I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.

The satanic contrast:

2 Th. 2:4 — Who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped; so that he as God sitteth in the temple of God, shewing himself that he is God.

Conclusion:

The only proper response:

Ps. 18:46 — The LORD liveth; and blessed be my rock; and let the God of my salvation be exalted.

Ps. 21:13 — Be thou exalted, LORD, in thine own strength: so will we sing and praise thy power.

Ps. 34:3 — O magnify the LORD with me, and let us exalt his name together.

Ps. 46:10 — Be still, and know that I am God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth.

Ps. 47:9 — The princes of the people are gathered together, even the people of the God of Abraham: for the shields of the earth belong unto God: he is greatly exalted.

Ps. 57:5, 11 — Be thou exalted, O God, above the heavens; let thy glory be above all the earth.

Ps. 99:5, 9 — 5 Exalt ye the LORD our God, and worship at his footstool; for he is holy….
9 Exalt the LORD our God, and worship at his holy hill; for the LORD our God is holy.

Ps. 107:32 — Let them exalt him also in the congregation of the people, and praise him in the assembly of the elders.

Ps. 108:5 — Be thou exalted, O God, above the heavens: and thy glory above all the earth;

Ps. 118:16, 28 — 16 The right hand of the LORD is exalted: the right hand of the LORD doeth valiantly….28 Thou art my God, and I will praise thee: thou art my God, I will exalt thee.

2 Cor. 10:5 — Casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ;

Jas. 1:9 — Let the brother of low degree rejoice in that he is exalted:

1Pet. 5:6 — Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time:

[Sermon preached 19 FEB 2017 by Pastor John T. “Jack” Jeffery at Wayside Gospel Chapel, Greentown, PA.]

Complete Outline:

Part 2: The Exaltation of Christ in The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:9-11)

I. The Unparalleled Exaltation of His Christ (2:9)

1. The Preeminent Exaltation of His Servant —
            Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him

2. The Superlative Designation of His Name —
            and given him a name which is above every name

Appendix I: Miscellaneous Resources on Philippians 2:5-11

1. Sermons

John Chrysostom (349-407), “The Homilies Of St. John Chrysostom Archbishop Of Constantinople, On The Epistles Of St. Paul The Apostle To The Philippians, Colossians, And Thessalonians,” trans. John A. Broadus, in Saint Chrysostom: Homilies On Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Thessalonians, Timothy, Titus, And Philemon, Vol. XIII in A Select Library Of The Nicene And Post-Nicene Fathers Of The Christian Church, ed. Philip Schaff (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark; Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans, n.d.), pp. 206-218, s.v. “Homily VI. Philippians ii. 5–8,” and “Homily VII. Philippians ii. 5–11;” on Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL) at https://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.iv.iii.vii.html and https://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.iv.iii.viii.html respectively [accessed 14 JAN 2017].

John Murray, “The Mystery of Godliness” (sermon on Phil. 2:5-9), in Collected Writings of John Murray, 4 vols., Vol. 3: Life of John Murray, Sermons & Reviews (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1982), pp. 236-241.

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, “Imitating the Incarnation” (Phil. 2:5-8), sermon in The Gospel of the Incarnation (New York: Randolph, 1893), reprinted in The Saviour of the World (New York: Hodder and Stoughton, 1914; reprinted Cherry Hill, NJ: Mack, 1972), pp. 247-270; and in The Person and Work of Christ, ed. Samuel G. Craig (Philadelphia: Presbyterian and Reformed, 1950), pp. 563-575; downloadable PDF file on The Gospel Coalition at https://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/justintaylor/page/files/2010/09/Warfield-Imitating-the-Incarnation2.pdf [accessed 15 JAN 2017].

2. Specialized Studies

Daniel J. Fabricatore, A Lexical, Exegetical, and Theological Examination of the Greek Noun [Morphē] in Philippians 2:6-7, Ph.D. dissertation (Clarks Summit, PA: Baptist Bible Seminary, 2008); published as Form of God, Form of a Servant: An Examination of the Greek Noun [Morphē] in Philippians 2:6-7 (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2010).

Robert F. Gundry, “Style and Substance in “The Myth of God Incarnate” According to Philippians 2:6-11,” in Crossing the Boundaries: Essays in Biblical Interpretation in Honour of Michael D. Goulder, eds. Stanley E. Porter, Paul M. Joyce, and David E. Orton Biblical Interpretation Series, eds. R. Alan Culpepper, and Rolf Rendtorff, v. 8 (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1994), pp. 271-293.

Ralph P. Martin, An Early Christian Confession: Philippians II. 5-11 in Recent Interpetation (London: Tyndale, 1960).

Ralph P. Martin, A Hymn of Christ: Philippians 2:5-11 in Recent Interpretation & in the Setting of Early Christian Worship, 2nd rev. ed. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1997; previous rev. ed. by Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 1983; 1st ed. titled Carmen Christi: Philippians ii. 5-11 in Recent Interpretation and in the Setting of Early Christian Worship, Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 4, by Cambridge University, London, 1967).

Ralph P. Martin, and Brian J. Dodd, eds., Where Christology Began: Essays on Philippians 2 (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox, 1998).

Wayne A. Meeks, “The Man From Heaven in Paul’s Letter to the Philippians,” in The Future of Early Christianity: Essays in Honor of Helmut Koester, eds. Birger A. Pearson, A. Thomas. Kraabel, George W. E. Nickelsburg, and Norman R. Petersen (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1991), pp. 329-336.

C. F. D. Moule, “Further Reflexions on Philippians 2:5-11,” in Apostolic History and the Gospel: Biblical and Historical Essays Presented to F.F. Bruce on his 60th birthday, eds. W. Ward Gasque, and Ralph P. Martin (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1970), pp. 264-276.

3. Sources for the Greek Text of the New Testament and Textual Criticism:

P. W. Comfort, New Testament Text and Translation Commentary: Commentary on the Variant Readings of the Ancient New Testament Manuscripts and How They Relate to the Major English Translations (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House, 2008).

The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text, 2nd ed., eds. Zane C. Hodges, Arthur L. Farstad, et al. (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1985).

Bruce M. Metzger, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament: A Companion Volume to the United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament (third edition) (Stuttgart, Germany: United Bible Societies, 1971).

Bruce M. Metzger, and United Bible Societies, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, Second Edition a Companion Volume to the United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament (4th rev. ed.) (London; New York: United Bible Societies, 1994).

Novum Testamentum Graece, eds. Eberhard and Erwin Nestle, 27th ed., eds. Barbara and Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, and Bruce M. Metzger (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1898, 1993).

Maurice A. Robinson and William G. Pierpont, The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005 (Southborough, MA: Chilton Book Publishing, 2006).

4. Greek Grammar and Vocabulary Resources

F. Blass, and A. Debrunner, A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 9th ed., trans. and rev. Robert W. Funk (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1961).

Ernest De Witt Burton, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses in New Testament Greek, 3rd ed. (Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, 1978 reprint of 1900 edition, University of Chicago Press, Chicago).

H. E. Dana and Julius R. Mantey, A Manual Grammar of the Greek New Testament (Toronto: The Macmillan Co., 1927, 1955).

G. Adolf Deissmann, Bible Studies: Contributions Chiefly from Papyri and Inscriptions to the History of the Language, the Literature, and the Religion of Hellenistic Judaism and Primitive Christianity, trans. Alexander Grieve (Winona Lake, IN: Alpha Publications, n.d.; 1979 ed., reprint of Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1923, combining both Bibelstudien and Neue Bibelstudien).

Adolf Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East: The New Testament Illustrated by Recently Discovered Texts of the Graeco-Roman World, 4th rev. ed. of Licht vom Osten (Tübingen, 1909, 1923), trans. Lionel R. M. Strachan (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1978 ed.).

Murray J. Harris, Prepositions and Theology in the Greek New Testament (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2012).

Johannes P. Louw and Eugene A. Nida, eds., Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains, 2nd ed., 2 vols. (New York: United Bible Societies, 1988, 1989).

C. F. D. Moule, An Idiom-Book of New Testament Greek, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1953, 1959).

James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek, 4 vols. (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1978).

James Hope Moulton, Prolegomena, 3rd ed., Vol. I in James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark).

James Hope Moulton and George Milligan, The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament Illustrated from the Papyrii and other Non-Literary Sources (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., n.d.; 1930 ed.).

The New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, 3 vols., gen. ed. Colin Brown, English ed. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan Publishing House, 1978; trans. from Germ. original, Theologisches Begriffslexikon Zum Neuen Testament, 1971 by Theologischer Verlag Rolf Brockhaus, Wuppertal).

A. T. Robertson, A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research, 4th ed. (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1934).

G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley, and G. Friedrich, eds., Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, electronic ed., trans. G. W. Bromiley (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1964-1976).

Nigel Turner, Style, Vol. IV in James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1976).
           
Nigel Turner, Syntax, Vol. III in James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1963).

G. B. Winer A Treatise on the Grammar of New Testament Greek: Regarded as a Sure Basis for New Testament Exegesis, 3rd ed., trans. W. F. Moulton, 9th ed. (Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1882).

5. Select Commentaries

Alfred Barry, “The Epistles to the Ephesians, Philippians, and Colossians,” in Ellicott’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: A Verse by Verse Explanation, ed. Charles John Ellicott, 8 vols. in 4 ed. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, n.d.; 1981 reprint of 1959 Zondervan ed.), VIII:61-90.

D. A. Carson, Basics For Believers: An Exposition of Philippians (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1996).

Fred B. Craddock, Philippians, in Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching, eds. James Luther Mays, and Paul J. Achtemeier (Louisville: John Knox, 1985).

J. Eadie, A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Epistle of Paul to the Philippians, 2nd ed., ed. W. Young (Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1884).

Robert Gromacki, Stand United in Joy: An Exposition of Philippians, The Gromacki Expository Series (The Woodlands, TX: Kress Christian, 2002).

G. Walter Hansen, The Letter to the Philippians, The Pillar New Testament Commentary, gen. ed. D. A. Carson (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 2009).

William Hendriksen, “Exposition of Philippians,” in Philippians, Colossians and Philemon, New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1962), pp. i-vi, and 1-218.

Matthew Henry, Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible (Iowa Falls, IA: World Bible Publishers, n.d.), VI:722-747

Robert Johnstone, Lectures Exegetical and Practical on the Epistle of Paul to the Philippians with a Revised Translation of the Epistle, and Notes on the Greek Text (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1955 reprint ed. from 1875 printing by William Oliphant and Co., Edinburgh).

Clarence M. Keen, Christian Joy, or Outlines and an Exposition of Paul’s Letter to the Philippians (n.p.; n.d.).

Joseph Barber Lightfoot, St. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, , n.d.; 1953 reprint ed. from 1913 original by Macmillan, London).

R. P. Lightner, “Philippians,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, 2 vols., eds. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck (Wheaton: Victor Books, 1985).

Ralph P. Martin, The Epistle of Paul to the Philippians: An Introduction and Commentary, Vol. 11 in The Tyndale New Testament Commentaries, gen. ed. R. V. G. Tasker (Grand Rapids:  Wm. B. Eerdmans, 1959).

J. Vernon McGee, Probing Through Philippians (Pasadena, CA: Thru the Bible Books, n.d.).

Matthew Poole, A Commentary on the Holy Bible, 3 vols. (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, n.d.; 1975 reprint of 1963 ed. from 1685 1st ed.), III:680-704.

A. T. Robertson, Paul’s Joy in Christ: Studies in Philippians, A. T. Robertson Library (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1917; 1979 reprint).

Archibald Thomas Robertson, Word Pictures in the New Testament (Nashville: Broadman, 1932).

Moisés Silva, Philippians, Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ed. Moisés Silva (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1992).

John Trapp, A Commentary Upon All the Books of the New Testament, 2nd ed., ed. W. Webster (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1981 reprint from 1865 ed. by Richard D. Dickinson), pp. 602-613.

M. R. Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887).

A. Blake White, Joyful Unity in the Gospel: The Call of Philippians (Colorado Springs, CO: Cross to Crown Ministries, 2015).

Appendix II: The Predicate Flow in Philippians 2:5-11

Verb
Parsing
Trans
Verbal
Parsing
Trans
φρονείσθω
Pres pass impv
3rdS?
[vs. 2ndP?]
Let this
mind be






ὑπάρχων
Pres act part
NMS
being
ἡγήσατο
Aor mid indic
3rdS
thought it






τὸ εἶναι
Pres act inf
to be
ἐκένωσεν
Aor act indic
3rdS
made…
of no reputation






λαβών
Aor act part
NMS
took



γενόμενος
Aor mid part
NMS
was
 made



εὑρεθεὶς
Aor pass part
NMS
being
found
ἐταπείνωσεν
Aor act indic
3rdS
humbled






γενόμενος
Aor mid part
NMS
became
ὑπερύψωσεν
Aor act indic
3rdS
hath highly
exalted



ἐχαρίσατο
Aor mid indic
3rdS
given



κάμψῃ
Aor act subj
3rdS
should
bow



ἐξομολογήσηται
Aor mid subj
3rdS
should
confess





End Notes:

[1] Donald Macleod, “Definite Atonement and the Divine Decree,” in From Heaven He Came and Sought Her: Definite Atonement in Historical, Biblical, Theological, and Pastoral Perspective, eds. David Gibson, and Jonathan Gibson (Wheaton: Crossway, 2013), pg. 418.

[2] G. Walter Hansen, The Letter to the Philippians, The Pillar New Testament Commentary, gen. ed. D. A. Carson (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 2009), pp. 161-162.

[3] William Hendriksen, “Exposition of Philippians,” in Philippians, Colossians and Philemon, New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1962), pg. 113.

[4] The Holy Bible: King James Version. (1995). (electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version., Is 53:12). Bellingham WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

[5] The Holy Bible: Holman Christian standard version. (2009). (Is 53:12). Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers.

[6] Tyndale House Publishers. (2013). Holy Bible: New Living Translation (Is 53:12). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers.

[7] R. Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and D. Brown, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997), 1:492.

[8] John Gill, Exposition of the Old and New Testament (originally published in 9 vols.; 1746-1763); on Bible Hub at http://biblehub.com/commentaries/gill/isaiah/53.htm [accessed 16 FEB 2017]; from Internet Sacred Text Archive at http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/cmt/gill/isa053.htm [accessed 16 FEB 2017].

[9] note 34 on Isaiah 53:12 at https://lumina.bible.org/bible/Isaiah+53 [accessed 16 FEB 2017].

[10] John W. Olley, “‘The Many’: How Is Isa 53,12a to Be Understood?” Biblica 68:3 (1987), pp. 330-356.

[11] Johannes P. Louw and Eugene A. Nida, eds., Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains, 2nd ed., 2 vols. (New York: United Bible Societies, 1988, 1989), 1: 568, s.v. 57.102 χαρίζομαιa.

[12] Hans Conzelmann, “χαίρω, χαρά, συγχαίρω, χάρις, χαρίζομαι, χαριτόω, ἀχάριστος, χάρισμα, εὐχαριστέω, εὐχαριστία, εὐχάριστος,” in G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley, and G. Friedrich, eds., Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, electronic ed., trans. G. W. Bromiley (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1964-1976), 9:396.

[13] For examples of the variety of views on this question see: Hansen, op. cit., pp. 162-162; Hendriksen, op. cit., pp. 115-117; Moisés Silva, Philippians, Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ed. Moisés Silva (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1992), pp. 129-130; Joseph Barber Lightfoot, St. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, , n.d.; 1953 reprint ed. from 1913 original by Macmillan, London), pp. 113-114; C. F. D. Moule, “Further Reflexions on Philippians 2:5-11,” in Apostolic History and the Gospel: Biblical and Historical Essays Presented to F.F. Bruce on his 60th birthday, eds. W. Ward Gasque, and Ralph P. Martin (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1970), pg. 270; C. F. D. Moule, An Idiom-Book of New Testament Greek, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1953, 1959), pp. 78, and note, pg. 205.