Verse of the Day

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Pastor's Sermon Notes: Philippians (series), Part 11: The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (Philippians 2:5-11), Part Five

Sermon Series: Philippians, Part 11
The Great Christological Confession:
The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi, Part Five
Philippians 2:5-11


[Audio file on Internet Archive at https://archive.org/details/Philippians25-11_976].

5  Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: 6 Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 7 But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 8 And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. 9 Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: 10 That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; 11 And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Introduction:

Verse 9 signaled a significant shift in the context. There is an abrupt reversal of the conclusion of verse 8, and a dramatic movement from the depths of Christ’s Humiliation to the opposite extreme in His Exaltation. Verses 9-11 express the exaltation of the Suffering Servant, the Lord Jesus Christ as one sentence.

Transition:

There is difficulty for us in the way the sentence comprising verses 9-11 is phrased in maintaining the connection to verse 5 and the reason why these verses are here in the first place. As we consider verses 10-11, and two significant aspects of what these verses teach us, we must enter into our consideration with an understanding of their purpose in the context. We must also come away from this study with an appreciation for their application to us in our relationships to God, to one another, and to those we know who are remain unregenerate.

Outline:

Part 2: The Exaltation of Christ in The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:9-11)

I. The Unparalleled Exaltation of His Christ (2:9)
1. The Preeminent Exaltation of His Servant —
            Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him
2. The Superlative Designation of His Name —
            and given him a name which is above every name

II. The Universal Prostration of His Creation (2:10)

III. The Unanimous Confession of His Coronation (2:11)

Previous Outlines:

The Preface to the The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:5)

1. The Supreme Incarnational Mindset: This mind

2. The Sanctified Indwelling Mentality: in you…in Christ Jesus

3. The Shared Basis in Union with Christ: also

Part 1: The Humiliation of Christ The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:6-8)

I. The Mind-Boggling Mentality of the Messiah (2:6)

1. Eternal Deity — Who, being in the form of God

2. Essential Equality — thought it not robbery to be equal with God

II. The Essence of the Action of Incarnation (2:7)

1. The Hidden God — But made himself of no reputation

2. The Suffering Servant — and took upon him the form of a servant

3. The Son of Man — and was made in the likeness of men

III. The Highlighting of the Humiliation of Christ Jesus (2:8)

1. The Prerequisite for the Humiliation of Jesus Christ — And being found in fashion as a man

2. The Assertion of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ he humbled himself

3. The Nature of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ and became obedient unto death

4. The Extent of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ even the death of the cross.

Part 2: The Exaltation of Christ in The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:9-11)

Verses 10 and 11 express the reasons why God the Father graciously exalted Jesus, the Son of Man.

II. The Universal Prostration of His Creation (2:10)

That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth;

The first purpose in the Father’s exaltation of Jesus

1. The Occasion for the Prostration: That at the name of Jesus
2. The Action of Prostration: every knee should bow
3. The Extent of the Prostration: of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth

1. The Occasion for the Prostration: That at the name of Jesus

This is His name, the name that the Father graciously gave Him. This is His name, the Name that is above every name that is named.

Gen. 41:43 — And he made him to ride in the second chariot which he had; and they cried before him, Bow the knee: and he made him ruler over all the land of Egypt.

Judgment Day: Mt. 25:31-46

Mt. 7:21-23 — 21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. 22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works? 23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.

2. The Action of Prostration: every knee should bow

That at the sight of Jesus everyone should “fall at his feet as dead”?

Rev. 1:9-18 (17a) — 9 I John, who also am your brother, and companion in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ, was in the isle that is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus Christ. 10 I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day, and heard behind me a great voice, as of a trumpet, 11 Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send it unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea. 12 And I turned to see the voice that spake with me. And being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks; 13 And in the midst of the seven candlesticks one like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment down to the foot, and girt about the paps with a golden girdle. 14 His head and his hairs were white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes were as a flame of fire; 15 And his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace; and his voice as the sound of many waters. 16 And he had in his right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp twoedged sword: and his countenance was as the sun shineth in his strength.
17 And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last: 18 I am he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of hell and of death.

That whenever anyone hears “Jesus” they should genuflect? [1]

Rom. 14:11 — For it is written, As I live, saith the Lord, every knee shall bow to me, and every tongue shall confess to God.

Is. 45:17-25 (23) 17 But Israel shall be saved in the LORD with an everlasting salvation: ye shall not be ashamed nor confounded world without end. 18 For thus saith the LORD that created the heavens; God himself that formed the earth and made it; he hath established it, he created it not in vain, he formed it to be inhabited: I am the LORD; and there is none else. 19 I have not spoken in secret, in a dark place of the earth: I said not unto the seed of Jacob, Seek ye me in vain: I the LORD speak righteousness, I declare things that are right. 20 Assemble yourselves and come; draw near together, ye that are escaped of the nations: they have no knowledge that set up the wood of their graven image, and pray unto a god that cannot save. 21 Tell ye, and bring them near; yea, let them take counsel together: who hath declared this from ancient time?  who hath told it from that time?  have not I the LORD?  and there is no God else beside me; a just God and a Saviour; there is none beside me. 22 Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth: for I am God, and there is none else. 23 I have sworn by myself, the word is gone out of my mouth in righteousness, and shall not return, That unto me every knee shall bow, every tongue shall swear. 24 Surely, shall one say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: even to him shall men come; and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed. 25 In the LORD shall all the seed of Israel be justified, and shall glory.

Bowing the knee, kneeling, is a physical attitude of respect, worship and prayer.

Gen. 41:43 — And he made him to ride in the second chariot which he had; and they cried before him, Bow the knee: and he made him ruler over all the land of Egypt.

1 Ki. 8:54 — And it was so, that when Solomon had made an end of praying all this prayer and supplication unto the LORD, he arose from before the altar of the LORD, from kneeling on his knees with his hands spread up to heaven.

2 Ch. 6:13 — For Solomon had made a brasen scaffold, of five cubits long, and five cubits broad, and three cubits high, and had set it in the midst of the court: and upon it he stood, and kneeled down upon his knees before all the congregation of Israel, and spread forth his hands toward heaven,

1Ki. 19:18 — Yet I have left me seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not bowed unto Baal, and every mouth which hath not kissed him.

Ezra 9:5 — And at the evening sacrifice I arose up from my heaviness; and having rent my garment and my mantle, I fell upon my knees, and spread out my hands unto the LORD my God.

Da. 6:10 — Now when Daniel knew that the writing was signed, he went into his house; and his windows being open in his chamber toward Jerusalem, he kneeled upon his knees three times a day, and prayed, and gave thanks before his God, as he did aforetime.

C. S. Lewis, Screwtape Letters, IV:
MY DEAR WORMWOOD,
The amateurish suggestions in your last letter warn me that it is high time for me to write to you fully on the painful subject of prayer. You might have spared the comment that my advice about his prayers for his mother it "proved singularly unfortunate". That is not the sort of thing that a nephew should write to his uncle—nor a junior tempter to the under-secretary of a department. It also reveals an unpleasant desire to shift responsibility; you must learn to pay for your own blunders.
The best thing, where it is possible, is to keep the patient from the serious intention of praying altogether. When the patient is an adult recently re-converted to the Enemy's party, like your man, this is best done by encouraging him to remember, or to think he remembers, the parrot-like nature of his prayers in childhood. In reaction against that, he may be persuaded to aim at something entirely spontaneous, inward, informal, and unregularised; and what this will actually mean to a beginner will be an effort to produce in himself a vaguely devotional mood in which real concentration of will and intelligence have no part. One of their poets, Coleridge, has recorded that he did not pray "with moving lips and bended knees" but merely "composed his spirit to love" and indulged "a sense of supplication". That is exactly the sort of prayer we want; and since it bears a superficial resemblance to the prayer of silence as practised by those who are very far advanced in the Enemy's service, clever and lazy patients can be taken in by it for quite a long time. At the very least, they can be persuaded that the bodily position makes no difference to their prayers; for they constantly forget, what you must always remember, that they are animals and that whatever their bodies do affects their souls. It is funny how mortals always picture us as putting things into their minds: in reality our best work is done by keeping things out.
If this fails, you must fall back on a subtler misdirection of his intention. Whenever they are attending to the Enemy Himself we are defeated, but there are ways of preventing them from doing so. The simplest is to turn their gaze away from Him towards themselves. Keep them watching their own minds and trying to produce feelings there by the action of their own wills. When they meant to ask Him for charity, let them, instead, start trying to manufacture charitable feelings for themselves and not notice that this is what they are doing. When they meant to pray for courage, let them really be trying to feel brave. When they say they are praying for forgiveness, let them be trying to feel forgiven. Teach them to estimate the value of each prayer by their success in producing the desired feeling; and never let them suspect how much success or failure of that kind depends on whether they are well or ill, fresh or tired, at the moment.
But of course the Enemy will not meantime be idle. Wherever there is prayer, there is danger of His own immediate action. He is cynically indifferent to the dignity of His position, and ours, as pure spirits, and to human animals on their knees He pours out self-knowledge in a quite shameless fashion. But even if He defeats your first attempt at misdirection, we have a subtler weapon. The humans do not start from that direct perception of Him which we, unhappily, cannot avoid. They have never known that ghastly luminosity, that stabbing and searing glare which makes the background of permanent pain to our lives. If you look into your patient's mind when he is praying, you will not find that. If you examine the object to which he is attending, you will find that it is a composite object containing many quite ridiculous ingredients. There will be images derived from pictures of the Enemy as He appeared during the discreditable episode known as the Incarnation: there will be vaguer—perhaps quite savage and puerile—images associated with the other two Persons. There will even be some of his own reverence (and of bodily sensations accompanying it) objectified and attributed to the object revered. I have known cases where what the patient called his "God" was actually located—up and to the left at the corner of the bedroom ceiling, or inside his own head, or in a crucifix on the wall. But whatever the nature of the composite object, you must keep him praying to it—to the thing that he has made, not to the Person who has made him. You may even encourage him to attach great importance to the correction and improvement of his composite object, and to keeping it steadily before his imagination during the whole prayer. For if he ever comes to make the distinction, if ever he consciously directs his prayers "Not to what I think thou art but to what thou knowest thyself to be", our situation is, for the moment, desperate. Once all his thoughts and images have been flung aside or, if retained, retained with a full recognition of their merely subjective nature, and the man trusts himself to the completely real, external, invisible Presence, there with him in the room and never knowable by him as he is known by it—why, then it is that the incalculable may occur. In avoiding this situation—this real nakedness of the soul in prayer—you will be helped by the fact that the humans themselves do not desire it as much as they suppose. There's such a thing as getting more than they bargained for!
Your affectionate uncle  
SCREWTAPE

Ps. 95:6 — O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the LORD our maker.

3. The Extent of the Prostration: of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth

of things in heaven

Heb. 1:6 — And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.

and things in earth

and things under the earth;

Eph. 1:10 — That in the dispensation of the fulness of times he might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on earth; even in him:

Col. 1:15-22 (20) — 15 Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature:
16 For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: 17 And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.
18 And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. 19 For it pleased the Father that in him should all fulness dwell; 20 And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven.
21 And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled 22 In the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight:

Rev. 5:3 — And no man in heaven, nor in earth, neither under the earth, was able to open the book, neither to look thereon.

Rev. 5:11-14 (13) — 11 And I beheld, and I heard the voice of many angels round about the throne and the beasts and the elders: and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands; 12 Saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. 13 And every creature which is in heaven, and on the earth, and under the earth, and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, heard I saying, Blessing, and honour, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever. 14 And the four beasts said, Amen. And the four and twenty elders fell down and worshipped him that liveth for ever and ever.

III. The Unanimous Confession of His Coronation (2:11)

And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

The second purpose in the Father’s exaltation of Jesus

And that every tongue should confess

that Jesus Christ is Lord,

to the glory of God the Father.

On the extent of this phrase see especially Murray J. Harris, Prepositions and Theology in the Greek New Testament, pp. 92-93.

Jn. 13:13 — Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; for so I am.

Rom. 10:9 — That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
                     
1 Cor. 12:3 — Wherefore I give you to understand, that no man speaking by the Spirit of God calleth Jesus accursed: and that no man can say that Jesus is the Lord, but by the Holy Ghost.

Rom. 14:9 — For to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that he might be Lord both of the dead and living.

[Sermon preached 26 FEB 2017 by Pastor John T. “Jack” Jeffery at Wayside Gospel Chapel, Greentown, PA.]

Complete Outline:

The Preface to the The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:5)

1. This mind

2. in you…in Christ Jesus

3. also

Part 1: The Humiliation of Christ The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:6-8)

I. The Mind-Boggling Mentality of the Messiah (2:6)

1. Eternal Deity — Who, being in the form of God

2. Essential Equality — thought it not robbery to be equal with God

II. The Essence of the Action of Incarnation (2:7)

1. The Hidden God — But made himself of no reputation

2. The Suffering Servant — and took upon him the form of a servant

3. The Son of Man — and was made in the likeness of men

III. The Highlighting of the Humiliation of Christ Jesus (2:8)

1. The Prerequisite for the Humiliation of Jesus Christ — And being found in fashion as a man

2. The Assertion of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ he humbled himself

3. The Nature of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ and became obedient unto death

4. The Extent of the Humiliation of Jesus Christ even the death of the cross.

Part 2: The Exaltation of Christ in The Great Christological Confession: The Apostle Paul’s Carmen Christi (2:9-11)

I. The Unparalleled Exaltation of His Christ (2:9)

1. The Preeminent Exaltation of His Servant —
            Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him

2. The Superlative Designation of His Name —
            and given him a name which is above every name

II. The Universal Prostration of His Creation (2:10)

1. The Occasion for the Prostration: That at the name of Jesus

2. The Action of Prostration: every knee should bow

3. The Extent of the Prostration: of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth

III. The Unanimous Confession of His Coronation (2:11)

Hymn Suggestions:

 “Blessed Be the Name”

 “Glory to His Name,” AKA “Down at the Cross Where My Savior Died”

 “O How I Love Jesus,” AKA “There Is a Name I Love to Hear”

 “Hallelujah, What A Savior,” AKA ”Man of Sorrows,” What a Name”

 “How Sweet the Name of Jesus Sounds”

Appendix I: Miscellaneous Resources on Philippians 2:5-11

1. Sermons

John Chrysostom (349-407), “The Homilies Of St. John Chrysostom Archbishop Of Constantinople, On The Epistles Of St. Paul The Apostle To The Philippians, Colossians, And Thessalonians,” trans. John A. Broadus, in Saint Chrysostom: Homilies On Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Thessalonians, Timothy, Titus, And Philemon, Vol. XIII in A Select Library Of The Nicene And Post-Nicene Fathers Of The Christian Church, ed. Philip Schaff (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark; Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans, n.d.), pp. 206-218, s.v. “Homily VI. Philippians ii. 5–8,” and “Homily VII. Philippians ii. 5–11;” on Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL) at https://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.iv.iii.vii.html and https://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.iv.iii.viii.html respectively [accessed 14 JAN 2017].

John Murray, “The Mystery of Godliness” (sermon on Phil. 2:5-9), in Collected Writings of John Murray, 4 vols., Vol. 3: Life of John Murray, Sermons & Reviews (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1982), pp. 236-241.

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, “Imitating the Incarnation” (Phil. 2:5-8), sermon in The Gospel of the Incarnation (New York: Randolph, 1893), reprinted in The Saviour of the World (New York: Hodder and Stoughton, 1914; reprinted Cherry Hill, NJ: Mack, 1972), pp. 247-270; and in The Person and Work of Christ, ed. Samuel G. Craig (Philadelphia: Presbyterian and Reformed, 1950), pp. 563-575; downloadable PDF file on The Gospel Coalition at https://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/justintaylor/page/files/2010/09/Warfield-Imitating-the-Incarnation2.pdf [accessed 15 JAN 2017].

2. Specialized Studies

Daniel J. Fabricatore, A Lexical, Exegetical, and Theological Examination of the Greek Noun [Morphē] in Philippians 2:6-7, Ph.D. dissertation (Clarks Summit, PA: Baptist Bible Seminary, 2008); published as Form of God, Form of a Servant: An Examination of the Greek Noun [Morphē] in Philippians 2:6-7 (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2010).

Robert F. Gundry, “Style and Substance in “The Myth of God Incarnate” According to Philippians 2:6-11,” in Crossing the Boundaries: Essays in Biblical Interpretation in Honour of Michael D. Goulder, eds. Stanley E. Porter, Paul M. Joyce, and David E. Orton Biblical Interpretation Series, eds. R. Alan Culpepper, and Rolf Rendtorff, v. 8 (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1994), pp. 271-293.

Ralph P. Martin, An Early Christian Confession: Philippians II. 5-11 in Recent Interpetation (London: Tyndale, 1960).

Ralph P. Martin, A Hymn of Christ: Philippians 2:5-11 in Recent Interpretation & in the Setting of Early Christian Worship, 2nd rev. ed. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1997; previous rev. ed. by Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 1983; 1st ed. titled Carmen Christi: Philippians ii. 5-11 in Recent Interpretation and in the Setting of Early Christian Worship, Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 4, by Cambridge University, London, 1967).

Ralph P. Martin, and Brian J. Dodd, eds., Where Christology Began: Essays on Philippians 2 (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox, 1998).

Wayne A. Meeks, “The Man From Heaven in Paul’s Letter to the Philippians,” in The Future of Early Christianity: Essays in Honor of Helmut Koester, eds. Birger A. Pearson, A. Thomas. Kraabel, George W. E. Nickelsburg, and Norman R. Petersen (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1991), pp. 329-336.

C. F. D. Moule, “Further Reflexions on Philippians 2:5-11,” in Apostolic History and the Gospel: Biblical and Historical Essays Presented to F.F. Bruce on his 60th birthday, eds. W. Ward Gasque, and Ralph P. Martin (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1970), pp. 264-276.

3. Sources for the Greek Text of the New Testament and Textual Criticism:

P. W. Comfort, New Testament Text and Translation Commentary: Commentary on the Variant Readings of the Ancient New Testament Manuscripts and How They Relate to the Major English Translations (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House, 2008).

The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text, 2nd ed., eds. Zane C. Hodges, Arthur L. Farstad, et al. (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1985).

Bruce M. Metzger, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament: A Companion Volume to the United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament (third edition) (Stuttgart, Germany: United Bible Societies, 1971).

Bruce M. Metzger, and United Bible Societies, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, Second Edition a Companion Volume to the United Bible Societies' Greek New Testament (4th rev. ed.) (London; New York: United Bible Societies, 1994).

Novum Testamentum Graece, eds. Eberhard and Erwin Nestle, 27th ed., eds. Barbara and Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, and Bruce M. Metzger (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1898, 1993).

Maurice A. Robinson and William G. Pierpont, The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005 (Southborough, MA: Chilton Book Publishing, 2006).

4. Greek Grammar and Vocabulary Resources

F. Blass, and A. Debrunner, A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 9th ed., trans. and rev. Robert W. Funk (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1961).

Ernest De Witt Burton, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses in New Testament Greek, 3rd ed. (Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, 1978 reprint of 1900 edition, University of Chicago Press, Chicago).

H. E. Dana and Julius R. Mantey, A Manual Grammar of the Greek New Testament (Toronto: The Macmillan Co., 1927, 1955).

G. Adolf Deissmann, Bible Studies: Contributions Chiefly from Papyri and Inscriptions to the History of the Language, the Literature, and the Religion of Hellenistic Judaism and Primitive Christianity, trans. Alexander Grieve (Winona Lake, IN: Alpha Publications, n.d.; 1979 ed., reprint of Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1923, combining both Bibelstudien and Neue Bibelstudien).

Adolf Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East: The New Testament Illustrated by Recently Discovered Texts of the Graeco-Roman World, 4th rev. ed. of Licht vom Osten (Tübingen, 1909, 1923), trans. Lionel R. M. Strachan (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1978 ed.).

Murray J. Harris, Prepositions and Theology in the Greek New Testament (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2012).

Johannes P. Louw and Eugene A. Nida, eds., Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains, 2nd ed., 2 vols. (New York: United Bible Societies, 1988, 1989).

C. F. D. Moule, An Idiom-Book of New Testament Greek, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1953, 1959).

James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek, 4 vols. (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1978).

James Hope Moulton, Prolegomena, 3rd ed., Vol. I in James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark).

James Hope Moulton and George Milligan, The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament Illustrated from the Papyrii and other Non-Literary Sources (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., n.d.; 1930 ed.).

The New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, 3 vols., gen. ed. Colin Brown, English ed. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan Publishing House, 1978; trans. from Germ. original, Theologisches Begriffslexikon Zum Neuen Testament, 1971 by Theologischer Verlag Rolf Brockhaus, Wuppertal).

A. T. Robertson, A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research, 4th ed. (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1934).

G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley, and G. Friedrich, eds., Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, electronic ed., trans. G. W. Bromiley (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1964-1976).

Nigel Turner, Style, Vol. IV in James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1976).
           
Nigel Turner, Syntax, Vol. III in James Hope Moulton, A Grammar of New Testament Greek (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1963).

G. B. Winer A Treatise on the Grammar of New Testament Greek: Regarded as a Sure Basis for New Testament Exegesis, 3rd ed., trans. W. F. Moulton, 9th ed. (Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1882).

5. Select Commentaries

Alfred Barry, “The Epistles to the Ephesians, Philippians, and Colossians,” in Ellicott’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: A Verse by Verse Explanation, ed. Charles John Ellicott, 8 vols. in 4 ed. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, n.d.; 1981 reprint of 1959 Zondervan ed.), VIII:61-90.

D. A. Carson, Basics For Believers: An Exposition of Philippians (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1996).

Fred B. Craddock, Philippians, in Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching, eds. James Luther Mays, and Paul J. Achtemeier (Louisville: John Knox, 1985).

J. Eadie, A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Epistle of Paul to the Philippians, 2nd ed., ed. W. Young (Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1884).

Robert Gromacki, Stand United in Joy: An Exposition of Philippians, The Gromacki Expository Series (The Woodlands, TX: Kress Christian, 2002).

G. Walter Hansen, The Letter to the Philippians, The Pillar New Testament Commentary, gen. ed. D. A. Carson (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 2009).

William Hendriksen, “Exposition of Philippians,” in Philippians, Colossians and Philemon, New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1962), pp. i-vi, and 1-218.

Matthew Henry, Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible (Iowa Falls, IA: World Bible Publishers, n.d.), VI:722-747

Robert Johnstone, Lectures Exegetical and Practical on the Epistle of Paul to the Philippians with a Revised Translation of the Epistle, and Notes on the Greek Text (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1955 reprint ed. from 1875 printing by William Oliphant and Co., Edinburgh).

Clarence M. Keen, Christian Joy, or Outlines and an Exposition of Paul’s Letter to the Philippians (n.p.; n.d.).

Joseph Barber Lightfoot, St. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, , n.d.; 1953 reprint ed. from 1913 original by Macmillan, London).

R. P. Lightner, “Philippians,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, 2 vols., eds. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck (Wheaton: Victor Books, 1985).

Ralph P. Martin, The Epistle of Paul to the Philippians: An Introduction and Commentary, Vol. 11 in The Tyndale New Testament Commentaries, gen. ed. R. V. G. Tasker (Grand Rapids:  Wm. B. Eerdmans, 1959).

J. Vernon McGee, Probing Through Philippians (Pasadena, CA: Thru the Bible Books, n.d.).

Matthew Poole, A Commentary on the Holy Bible, 3 vols. (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, n.d.; 1975 reprint of 1963 ed. from 1685 1st ed.), III:680-704.

A. T. Robertson, Paul’s Joy in Christ: Studies in Philippians, A. T. Robertson Library (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1917; 1979 reprint).

Archibald Thomas Robertson, Word Pictures in the New Testament (Nashville: Broadman, 1932).

Moisés Silva, Philippians, Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ed. Moisés Silva (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1992).

John Trapp, A Commentary Upon All the Books of the New Testament, 2nd ed., ed. W. Webster (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, n.d.; 1981 reprint from 1865 ed. by Richard D. Dickinson), pp. 602-613.

M. R. Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887).

A. Blake White, Joyful Unity in the Gospel: The Call of Philippians (Colorado Springs, CO: Cross to Crown Ministries, 2015).

Appendix II: The Predicate Flow in Philippians 2:5-11

Verb
Parsing
Trans
Verbal
Parsing
Trans
φρονείσθω
Pres pass impv
3rdS?
[vs. 2ndP?]
Let this
mind be






ὑπάρχων
Pres act part
NMS
being
ἡγήσατο
Aor mid indic
3rdS
thought it






τὸ εἶναι
Pres act inf
to be
ἐκένωσεν
Aor act indic
3rdS
made…
of no reputation






λαβών
Aor act part
NMS
took



γενόμενος
Aor mid part 
NMS
was
 made



εὑρεθεὶς
Aor pass part 
NMS
being
found
ἐταπείνωσεν
Aor act indic
3rdS
humbled






γενόμενος
Aor mid part 
NMS
became
ὑπερύψωσεν
Aor act indic
3rdS
hath highly
exalted



ἐχαρίσατο
Aor mid indic
3rdS
given



κάμψῃ
Aor act subj
3rdS
should
bow



ἐξομολογήσηται
Aor mid subj
3rdS
should
confess






End Notes:


[1] For the complicated traditions involving occasions for genuflection outside of Evangelicalism and Reformed Protestantism see “Genuflection” on Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genuflection [accessed 25 FEB 2017].

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Eighteen

Notice of schedule change: Session Eighteen of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ has been postponed. This session was originally scheduled for WED 22 NOV 2017, but has been rescheduled for WED 13 DEC 2017

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview

Session Eighteen: “Martin Luther, Part One” 

Date and Time: Wednesday 13 DEC 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Note: In this session we will begin our study of the Protestant Reformation with a viewing of the 1953 film, Martin Luther, which was nominated for two Academy Awards. A remarkable aspect to the production of this film was the careful historical research involving the assistance of two respected scholars on the Reformation: Theodore G. Tappert (1904-1973), Schieren Professor of the History of Christianity at Lutheran Theological Seminary (Philadelphia, PA); and Jaroslav Pelikan (1923-2006). Pelikan, who was teaching at Valparaiso University and Confordia Theological Seminary at the time, went on to co-edit Luther's Works, 15 vols. (Philadelphia: Concordia, 1955-1960), and to receive Yale University's highest academic honor with his appointment as Sterling Professor of History in 1972.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ: An Introduction and Overview, Session Seventeen

Notice of schedule change: Session Seventeen of The Course of the History of the True Church of Jesus Christ has been postponed. This session was originally scheduled for WED 11 OCT 2017, but due to a conflict has been rescheduled for WED 8 NOV 2017. Session Eighteen is now scheduled for WED 22 NOV 2017.

The Course of the History 
of the True Church of Jesus Christ:
An Introduction and Overview

Session Seventeen: “Hus, the Hussites, and the Bohemian Reformation” 

Date and Time: Wednesday 8 NOV 2017 at 7:00 P.M.

Venue: Faith Baptist Fellowship Church
1397 Easton Turnpike, Lake Ariel, PA 18436

Speaker: John T. Jack Jeffery, 
Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel
Greentown, PA

Note: There will be two sessions in the month of November due to there being 5 Wednesdays that month. We will begin our study of the Reformation with Martin Luther, Deo volente, on WED 22 NOV 2017.